Bathroom For Elderly

Bathroom For Elderly

Bathroom Remodeling Ideas for Elderly Access Grab bars, shower benches and handheld shower heads help elderly people age in place. (Photo courtesy of Globe Bath and Kitchen) Whether you plan to age in place or need a safer space, these features can make any bathroom more accessible. Injuries that occur in the bathroom are more frequent in older populations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Whether you’re getting older yourself, want to plan ahead or are moving a parent into your home, there are several bathroom remodeling steps you can take to make the space more accommodating to seniors. Some are simple fixes you can do yourself, while others will likely require the services of a handyman or contractor. All of them depend on the level of mobility of the person using the bathroom. Related Article Remodeling – General Accessibility Upgrades Help Elderly Aging in PlaceBy making some additions and doing some remodeling, your home can remain accessible as you grow older. Bathroom safety improvements you can do yourself• Install grab bars. Installing grab bars in the shower and around the toilet can help older people stay steady on their feet. Wall bars should be installed parallel to the ground. • Improve lighting. As vision tends to decrease with age, it’s important to make sure the bathroom is well lit. This might be as simple as replacing bulbs or swapping out existing light fixtures. • Change door handles and knobs. Older hands may have a hard time grasping small components, so make sure the bathroom door handle and the knobs on any of the cabinets and sinks are large and easy to use. You may also want to replace the faucets in the shower if they stick or are difficult to turn. When replacing light fixtures, make sure they work with a wall switch and don’t have small knobs that need to be twisted. • Install a nonslip mat in the shower. Slippery surfaces are dangerous enough for the young, but they can be downright deadly for the elderly. Make sure your tub or shower has a nonslip mat on the floor. • Purchase a transfer chair. The side of a tub will get harder to climb over as legs get weaker with age. One solution is to cut a gap in the side of the tub. Another option is to buy a transfer chair. It allows a person to sit outside the tub and then scoot over and into the shower area. Related Article Universal Design Aids Baby Boomers’ Aging in PlaceIncorporating universal design into remodeling projects is essential for homeowners choosing to age in place. Bathroom improvements that require a contractor• Widen the doorway and remove thresholds. If they’re not already wide enough, doors should be widened to 32 to 36 inches. This facilitates wheelchair, scooter and walker access. Another option is to remove the threshold and replace it with a walk-in shower. • Raise or replace the sink. If the person using the bathroom will be in a wheelchair, the sink should be raised to a height of 30 to 34 inches and the bottom of the sink should be open and wide enough to allow the chair to fit. Otherwise, a sink could be raised to a height of 40 inches to help someone who has trouble bending over. • Install nonslip flooring. Slick surfaces and the elderly do not mix, so if you have glossy tile or marble on your bathroom floor, you might want to replace it with nonslip tile. • Install a special-height toilet. Elevating a toilet five to seven inches allows older adults to stand up more easily. A plumber can replace the existing toilet with one that has a taller profile, or the toilet seat can be replaced with an adjustable version that provides anywhere from three to six inches of extra height. You can also add inches to the toilet height by simply using a molded plastic seat. Related Article Remodeling – General Make Home a Haven for In-Laws, Aging in PlacePlan ahead for your own future or for integrating your parents or in-laws into your home. • Remove or replace rugs. Some people accessorize their bathrooms with rugs to have something soft to stand on while entering or exiting the shower. However, the soft backing on these makes them susceptible to slipping. The best thing to do is to remove the rug completely or replace it with a rubber mat that will not slip or move. • Install a thermostatic shower valve. Faucets with a thermostatic valve can’t get too hot, which reduces the possibility of burns. Are you considering remodeling your bathroom to improve accessibility for the elderly? Tell us about it in the comments section below. Editor’s note: This is an updated version of an article originally posted on Feb. 28, 2013. July 22, 2016By Michael Franco, Angie's List Contributor Post New Comment Name * email@youremail.com * The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly. Subject Type your comments here. * All comments are subject to review and approval prior to posting. Home page
bathroom for elderly 1

Bathroom For Elderly

6 Bathroom Safety Tips for The Elderly While the bathroom may be some people’s favorite room in the house – think relaxing bath – a refuge from daily pressures – it is also one of the most dangerous rooms in the house. This is especially true for older adults. With a little effort and using a few bathroom safety tips, you can make the bathroom a safe and relaxing place for everyone in the household. Why should you be concerned? Over four hundred individuals drown in the bath tub each year. In addition, many thousands slip or fall which can lead to serious injuries. Older adults are at greater risk of injury because some medications they take can cause dizziness or hypotension and they have more limited mobility. Also, many of the surfaces in the bathroom (metal, cold tile, and porcelain) can be slippery when wet and have little cushion or give when a person falls. Since many more older adults are staying at home longer as they age, bathroom safety and preventing falls in that particular room of the house should be a concern for everyone. Here are six tips to help keep your bathroom a safe – and relaxing – environment. Make sure the water heater temperature is at 120 degrees or lower. Older adults may not notice that the water is too hot. Their ability to feel heat may be decreased due to certain medical conditions, medications, or neurological damage. Older adults also have thinner skin. Bath water that is too hot can cause deeper burns with even brief exposure. If the water temperature is too high, it can lead to burns from scalding water. Try to have someone available for safety supervision. If you or a loved one has balance or mobility issues, it may be a good idea to bathe when someone is available to help if you need them. Another person can prevent you from falling or assist you if you require a help getting into and out of the bath tub. Have adequate lighting at night. Many people over the age of fifty know that sleeping through the night is a thing of the past. Getting up to go to the bathroom during the night is very common for older adults. Having a light on can help with orientation and prevent falls getting to and from the lavatory. Add safety fixtures and transfer equipment. A safe bathroom for elderly individuals sometimes requires a little remodeling. Consider removing an old tub that requires stepping over the edge with a new walk-in shower. Add grab bars next to the toilet and in the shower. If the bathtub cannot be removed, adding a transfer seat will prevent falls in older adults who lack muscular strength. Make sure the surfaces are skidproof. There are a number of skidproof surfaces available for both the bathtub/shower stall and the bathroom floor. Individual decals do not cover the majority of the tub floor so consider using a mat for the entire surface and rugs with rubber backing. Ensure access to the bathroom. Door locks are an additional concern when it comes to bathroom safety for older people. If someone needs help or a fall occurs, the individual may not be able to unlock the door from the inside. Locks on both sides of the doors can provide privacy while allowing a caretaker to enter the bathroom in case of an emergency. With people staying in their homes longer, it is everyone’s responsibility to consider bathroom safety and making bathrooms safe for the elderly. Older adults need your assistance to make sure they are safe in all areas of their home, but especially in the bathroom. Do you have a bathroom safety tip that you’d like to share? Please do so in the comments below! For more information, please review our Bath Safety Resources. +1 Tweet Share Share Pin
bathroom for elderly 2

Bathroom For Elderly

Whether you plan to age in place or need a safer space, these features can make any bathroom more accessible. Injuries that occur in the bathroom are more frequent in older populations, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Whether you’re getting older yourself, want to plan ahead or are moving a parent into your home, there are several bathroom remodeling steps you can take to make the space more accommodating to seniors. Some are simple fixes you can do yourself, while others will likely require the services of a handyman or contractor. All of them depend on the level of mobility of the person using the bathroom. Related Article Remodeling – General Accessibility Upgrades Help Elderly Aging in PlaceBy making some additions and doing some remodeling, your home can remain accessible as you grow older. Bathroom safety improvements you can do yourself• Install grab bars. Installing grab bars in the shower and around the toilet can help older people stay steady on their feet. Wall bars should be installed parallel to the ground. • Improve lighting. As vision tends to decrease with age, it’s important to make sure the bathroom is well lit. This might be as simple as replacing bulbs or swapping out existing light fixtures. • Change door handles and knobs. Older hands may have a hard time grasping small components, so make sure the bathroom door handle and the knobs on any of the cabinets and sinks are large and easy to use. You may also want to replace the faucets in the shower if they stick or are difficult to turn. When replacing light fixtures, make sure they work with a wall switch and don’t have small knobs that need to be twisted. • Install a nonslip mat in the shower. Slippery surfaces are dangerous enough for the young, but they can be downright deadly for the elderly. Make sure your tub or shower has a nonslip mat on the floor. • Purchase a transfer chair. The side of a tub will get harder to climb over as legs get weaker with age. One solution is to cut a gap in the side of the tub. Another option is to buy a transfer chair. It allows a person to sit outside the tub and then scoot over and into the shower area. Related Article Universal Design Aids Baby Boomers’ Aging in PlaceIncorporating universal design into remodeling projects is essential for homeowners choosing to age in place. Bathroom improvements that require a contractor• Widen the doorway and remove thresholds. If they’re not already wide enough, doors should be widened to 32 to 36 inches. This facilitates wheelchair, scooter and walker access. Another option is to remove the threshold and replace it with a walk-in shower. • Raise or replace the sink. If the person using the bathroom will be in a wheelchair, the sink should be raised to a height of 30 to 34 inches and the bottom of the sink should be open and wide enough to allow the chair to fit. Otherwise, a sink could be raised to a height of 40 inches to help someone who has trouble bending over. • Install nonslip flooring. Slick surfaces and the elderly do not mix, so if you have glossy tile or marble on your bathroom floor, you might want to replace it with nonslip tile. • Install a special-height toilet. Elevating a toilet five to seven inches allows older adults to stand up more easily. A plumber can replace the existing toilet with one that has a taller profile, or the toilet seat can be replaced with an adjustable version that provides anywhere from three to six inches of extra height. You can also add inches to the toilet height by simply using a molded plastic seat. Related Article Remodeling – General Make Home a Haven for In-Laws, Aging in PlacePlan ahead for your own future or for integrating your parents or in-laws into your home. • Remove or replace rugs. Some people accessorize their bathrooms with rugs to have something soft to stand on while entering or exiting the shower. However, the soft backing on these makes them susceptible to slipping. The best thing to do is to remove the rug completely or replace it with a rubber mat that will not slip or move. • Install a thermostatic shower valve. Faucets with a thermostatic valve can’t get too hot, which reduces the possibility of burns. Are you considering remodeling your bathroom to improve accessibility for the elderly? Tell us about it in the comments section below. Editor’s note: This is an updated version of an article originally posted on Feb. 28, 2013.

Bathroom For Elderly

Bathroom For Elderly
Bathroom For Elderly
Bathroom For Elderly